There are many similarities to look for and learn from in watching a yogi as well as an endurance athlete.

By Renee’ Fulkerson

I just returned from attending the 2019 Ironman on Kona, Big Island, Hawaii and it was epic. The Ironman race is a multi-event sporting contest demanding stamina, in particular in a consecutive triathlon of swimming 2.4-mile (3.86km), cycling 112-mile (180.25km), and running a marathon 26.22-mile (42.20km).

I am familiar with this environment as before I became a  Hatha Yoga teacher I did many years of pre and post race massage at Norba Mountain Bike Race events in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California. I have also attended many Xterra off road triathlons and trail running races as well as Tough Mudders.

I myself am not the competitive sports women type however, I enjoy attending these events and gain an incredible amount of knowledge about the human body, training and recovery. When I first arrive to a endurance sporting event like the above mention I feel as though my head might spin off while trying to observe all of this amazing human anatomy in real life. I observe these athletes while racing much like I approach my YogAlign classes there are many similarities to look for and learn from in watching a yogi as well as an endurance athlete.

First point I observe at an endurance race is at the starting line what does the athletes body language tell me? What is the expression on their face? At the take off does their body react with ease to the initial movement or is it clunky and out of sync? Much like I observe a new or longtime YogAlign student. At first glance do they look open and receptive or nervous and guarded, maybe tired from a long day at work or inspired and ready to rumble. When the new student or longtime student begins their YogAlign practice do they move with ease or do they appear to be stiff and sticky? Unlike the endurance athlete during a race I cannot shift anything for them to create favorable conditions however, in YogAlign class I can and will do just that. In keeping my YogAlign class size small and non competitive I can see what each student is doing as well as needing in order to create favorable conditions and results.

Inner Breath Yoga YogAlign Kauai Hawaii (9)
She is moving with ease, aligned and her feet are light and ready to go.

Second point I observe in regard to the endurance athlete and yogi or yogini is the transition between events/ postures. Has this transition been thought out and again is there an ease about it and are they showing any signs of pain/ fatigue in the physical body or facial expression? How is their breathing quality? I can tell the student or athlete is becoming fatigued, resistant, bored/ given up or is in discomfort when the gaze of their eyes begins to lower, chin starts tucking to chest (frontline collapsing), shoulders slump and or roll forward and feet/ legs look like heavy blocks pounding at the ground. Again I cannot support the endurance athlete but to only cheer them on and shout out keep going, keep breathing you got this however, the YogAlign student I will immediately attend to the issues in realigning the body posture, breath and hopefully the enthusiasum or bring them out of the posture all together if no positive benefit is being produced.

Inner Breath Yoga YogAlign Kauai Hawaii (8)
He is ready to transition to the run with his shoes already off.

Third point I observe and most important point is the halfway mark I ask myself by observing the athlete/ yogi are they doing more damage than good at this point? Meaning have they sustained and injury or woken up and old one that is creating a limp or undo pain, are they pushing beyond the bodies ability to sustain the pace/ posture and is it time to call it when more negative impacts are wreaking havoc (widespread destruction) on the body and a common recovery will not be enough. For the YogAlign student upon observation and possible communication with the student if I feel the negative is creeping in I ask the student to immediately stop or come out of a posture and possibly to not practice said posture at all. Example – if a YogAlign student is practicing full body recalibrator (supported splits) and I see, hear or feel they are in pain they need to come out immediately however, if they are feeling a small discomfort (2 on a scale 1-10) I can give them more yoga block support, que engage the core with breath and we will both know if the posture has been practice/ supported correctly with the benefits of the posture when the student comes out and up to standing (the discomfort will not linger). Yes, they may feel some sensation (created space or re-setting of the tension) in the groin, thigh or glutes but not pain. Remember you never get comfortable by being uncomfortable yoga is not supposed to hurt! As for the endurance athlete that is a personal judgement, personal trainer or a beloveds call to stop.

Inner Breath Yoga YogAlign Kauai Hawaii (19)
He has lost his stride foot steps close together (fatigue?) and facial expression (pain?)

Forth point and last point I observe (in regard to this blog) is about 15 minutes before the end of class or end of race. Now this is where body language and facial expression says it all bueno (good) or no bueno (no good). This point really encapsulates the first, second and third point however, I do understand an endurance athlete is going to drag themselves over the finish line when they are so close to the finishing (good, bad or ugly). lol  The YogAlign student however, will be ready for final resting posture savasana  or beaming with that feels so good face/ body, and does not want class to end by savoring space and time a little longer. I can personally relate to both the endurance athlete and the yogis desire for accomplishment and peace.

I consider it an honor to be sharing the last moments of a race or a YogAlign practice with an athlete or student as they have both equally committed their time and energy to this event/ class. I feel as though I also get to share in the joy, pride and gratitude they feel for themselves physically, emotionally and mentally after putting themselves out there and being vulnerable (some call that being brave).

If you are like me and enjoy anatomy in real life, being inspired and connecting  energetically on a heart level with others I highly recommend these type of events and yoga classes.  “once you stop learning, you start dying” -Albert Einstein

See you on the mat.

YogAlign or Swimming?

By Renee’ Fulkerson

To the question above my answer would be yes and yes.

Swimming like YogAlign engages the entire body throughout the entire movement this was the perfect solution to our required body movement regime.

Many of you already know my son Joaquin age 15 has been diagnosed with Pectus Excavatum, Scoliosis and Scheuermann’s Disease.

Refer to blog post https://innerbreathyoga.com/2019/05/21/our-journey-so-far/

Quick recap – I started Joaquin on a regular YogAlign practice schedule of three to four times a week starting in January 2019 shortly after his diagnosis.

This was a one on one program, one to two hours per practice with YogAlign teacher Renee’ Fulkerson AKA mom. Needless to say we had a few challenging moments to say the least until we found our rhythm. Joaquin is dedicated he knows YogAlign will be a part of his life for the rest of his life.

After roughly a few months Joaquin began attending my regularly scheduled public YogAlign Classes with a bit of hesitation of course. Then as teens/ mothers and sons start the debate on comprise we started a new dialog on body movement (exercise).

Swimming  Joaquin requested he be able to have the option of practicing YogAlign half the time and swimming the other. Swimming like YogAlign engages the entire body throughout the entire movement it was the perfect solution to our required body movement regime.

Now we are not only seeing amazing postural shifts from the regular YogAlign practice but also from the regular for us Ocean swimming and hey if your going to swim why not swim with the turtles?

YogAlign Inner Breath Yoga Island Kauai Hawaii (1)

My ConclusionPectus Excavatum, Scoliosis and Scheuermann’s Disease. have many symptoms that can benefit from a regular YogAlign practice and a good swim a few times a week.

See you on the mat.

Definition of swim: propel the body through water by using the limbs.

 Health Benefits of Swimming (web MD)

Intensity Level: Medium
You’ll use your lower and upper body muscles for a steady workout. You can make your swim harder by going faster or longer.

Areas It Targets
Core: Yes. Swimming gives your entire body a great workout, including your core.

Arms: Yes. You’ll need your arms for most swim strokes, so expect them to get a workout.

Legs: Yes. You’ll use your legs to propel yourself through the water.

Glutes: Yes. Swimming uses your glutes.

Back: Yes. Your back muscles will get a workout, whether you’re doing the backstroke or a water-based exercise class.

Type
Flexibility: Yes. Swimming will make you more flexible.

Aerobic: Yes. Your heart will keep pumping as you use your entire body to move through the water.

Strength: Yes. You’ll get stronger from the resistance of the water, which is about 12 times the level of air resistance. Try using hand-held paddles, foam noodles, or a kickboard for extra resistance.

Low-Impact: Yes. Swimming is an excellent low-impact workout. The water gives you buoyancy, so you’ll float through your exercise session without putting pressure on your joints.