How you assess posture depends on your objectives and often the assessment tools we are provided with only give us part of the story.

By Carol Robbins

How you assess posture depends on your objectives and often the assessment tools we are provided with only give us part of the story. Assessing static alignment in a given moment tells us about relationships and what we need to do to achieve them determines our current boundaries. I talk a lot about boundaries in my practice as determined by inappropriate tensions or body displacement.

Photo 1: this looks like good posture, ear over shoulder over hip. However, the front of the rib cage is in front of the front of the pelvis and although both are neutral relative to the ground they are not neutral relative to each other, resulting in excessive curvature, where the lumbar curve exceeds the lumbar region (looks like sway back).

Photo 2: I’ve corrected that excessive curvature by tucking the tailbone under and bringing the top of the pelvis back (the pubic bone not seen here would be in front of the ASIS bones). Interestingly, you can see that my neck has responded by hyper extending at the top of the cervical spine in an effort to keep head level (righting reflex).

Photo 3: ribs are back over pelvis and head is level again. This is a better relationship of the head/rib cage/pelvis and the spine and organs (including breathing) are better placed and spaced for functioning.
#alignmentmatters

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